Supporting Organisations

Caring for Cognitive Impairment is proudly supported by the following organisations. If your organisation is interested in supporting the campaign, please email cognitive.impairment@safetyandquality.gov.au

  • Alzheimers Australia

    The Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign recognises the need for a person-centred approach to care, which looks at the person as a whole and not just the symptom they are presenting with in hospital. People with dementia are at a high risk of delirium. 30%-40% of delirium cases can be prevented. Alzheimer’s Australia supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign because we can and must improve care outcomes for people living with dementia who go into hospital. 

  • Australasian College for Emergency Medicine

    The Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM) and its Fellows support the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign. ACEM is committed to advocating for increased awareness and recognition of cognitive impairment and promoting practices that will ensure positive outcomes for patients experiencing dementia or delirium in the hospital setting.

  • Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses' Association

    The Australasian Rehabilitation Nurses' Association commits to the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign and believes that advancing rehabilitative nursing principles in all health care settings will promote optimal outcomes for people at risk for and experiencing cognitive impairment.

  • Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

    Australian & New Zealand College of Anaesthetists supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign to raise awareness for the optimal recognition and management of this important condition in the community and ensure our patients remain safe in their preoperative journey.

  • Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine

    The Australian and New Zealand Society for Geriatric Medicine commits to advocating for high quality clinical care that includes assessment and management of cognitive function.

    Through its members, it commits to continue training and educating doctors and other clinical care providers about the importance of assessing and managing cognition in the hospital environment.

  • Australian Association of Gerontology

    Australian Association of Gerontology is committed to improving the prevention, recognition and treatment of cognitive impairments, such as dementia, and providing high quality care for older people based on the latest research and evidence based practice.

  • Australian College Of Nurse Practitioners

    Supporting organisation - Australian College of Nurse Practitioners - logo

    The Australian College Of Nurse Practitioners supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign.

  • Australian Healthcare & Hospitals Association

    The Australian Healthcare and Hospitals Association and its members are committed to safe, high quality care for all Australians, and to supporting people with cognitive impairment to receive the best health care possible.

  • Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation

    The Australian Nursing and Midwifery Foundation supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign.

  • Australian Patient Safety Foundation

    The Australian Patient Safety Foundation supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign.

  • Australian Private Hospitals Association

    The Australian Private Hospitals Association and our members support the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign as part of our commitment to ensuring the care we deliver is of the highest quality and all our patients remain safe.

  • Clinical Excellence Commission

    The Clinical Excellence Commission is committed to promoting improved care for patients with cognitive impairment to enhance safety and quality within NSW.

  • College of Clinical Neuropsychologists, Australian Psychological Society

    The College of Clinical Neuropsychologists, Australian Psychological Society, supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign; early recognition, appropriate  assessment and identification of underlying cognitive impairments enable accurate diagnosis and consideration of suitable treatment and management options, including for patients with more subtle impairments, which can significantly impact on activities and wellbeing.

  • Council on the Ageing Victoria

    The Council on the Ageing Victoria supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign.

  • Dementia Collaborative Research Centre

    Supporting organisation - Dementia Collaborative Research Centres - Logo

    The Dementia Collaborative Research Centre (Early Diagnosis and Prevention) is committed to supporting initiatives that help to improve the early, accurate diagnosis of dementia so that health consumers with cognitive impairment are able to access the best possible services and treatments appropriate to their needs and illness.

  • Dementia Training Australia

    Dementia Training Australia supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign to promote best practice care for people with delirium and dementia in acute care. 

  • Federation of Ethnic Communities Councils of Australia Inc

    The Federation of Ethnic Communities Councils of Australia Inc supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign.

  • HealthWISE New England North West

    HealthWISE New England North West supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign. As a memory assessment service provider, we aim to provide best practice care and service integration in the Northern Tablelands Region of NSW.

  • Hunter New England and Central Coast Primary Health Network

    Our commitment at Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network is to healthy people and healthy communities, and the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign is a practical demonstration of our support towards improving the health outcomes of people experiencing cognitive impairment.

    New England Dementia Partnership (February 2017)

    The New England Dementia Partnership is a collaboration between three of the leading health organisations in the New England North West region of NSW – HealthWISE New England North West, Hunter New England Local Health District (HNELHD) and the Hunter New England Central Coast Primary Health Network (HNECC PHN). The Partnership began in 2003 and its aim remains to: improve the health outcomes and quality of life for people living with dementia, their carers and families.

    With only half of dementia cases currently being diagnosed, reducing the barriers to timely assessment was a major challenge for the partnership. One strategy the group pursued was to identify those clinicians across the region who are able to administer an initial, brief screening tool to determine whether further assessment is required, and the dementia clinicians who are able to support general practitioners and medical specialists by undertaking a comprehensive dementia assessment.

    Another achievement has been the creation of a standardised referral form and referral pathway for memory assessment services. This has included an electronic referral which self-populates patient details and clinical information, such as test results into medical software (Medical Director and Best Practice). A clinical case discussion framework has also been developed to provide peer support across clinical settings and ensure reporting back to referring GPs.

    Documenting all of the information gathered by the partnership, as well as a suggested suite of validated screening and assessment tools, formed the basis of the New England North West Dementia Care Information booklet for clinicians and health workers. The booklet contains general information about dementia, as well as information specific to the region. The purpose of the document is to assist healthcare providers to recognise, assess, diagnose and manage dementia. An electronic version of the booklet contains links to further information, templates and training opportunities. All of the dementia partnership documents are available for download on the PHN website, visit:www.hneccphn.com.au.

    Despite the geographical challenges, the dementia partnership demonstrated that a collaboration between three organisations can form a team whose members are able to work together and make decisions as if they were employed by one organisation – the single, standardised referral and referral pathway are good examples of collaborative work practices. The work undertaken by the partnership has been built into the current roles and work hours of everyone on the team, to ensure a sustainable model beyond the current project. However, the work of the partnership would not have been sustained if it were not for the support of the executive managers of the three partner organisations, and a commitment from the team members to develop a strong working relationship to ensure a solid foundation for future project work.

    Planning is underway for 2017. The dementia partnership will continue to ensure dementia clinicians are trained in the use and interpretation of comprehensive dementia assessments, and will review and support the training of those clinical staff who administer brief and initial screening tools. The partnership also plans to provide a recommended suite of resources for those who are newly diagnosed with dementia, and their carers, to ensure consistency of information provided across the region.

    The New England Dementia Partnership thanks the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation (ACI) for seed funding from the Building Partnerships program, which aims to improve care of older people with complex health needs. The partnership also received support from the ACI to develop team skills in planning, diagnostics, solution design and evaluation, which will ensure sustainable program development.

  • Leading Age Services Australia

    Leading Age Services supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment initiative and reminds everyone that it affects many Australians and their carers who require our support and understanding.

  • National Institute for Dementia Research

    The National Institute for Dementia Research commits to the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign.

  • NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation

    ACI_NSWlogo

    The Agency for Clinical Innovation supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign. Our Care of Confused Hospitalised Older Persons Program supports hospitals to implement strategies to make a real difference. 

  • Occupational Therapy Australia

    OTA_Logo

    Occupational Therapy Australia supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign as occupational therapists provide a range of services to assist people with cognitive impairment to participate in everyday activities. 

  • Royal Australasian College of Physicians

    The Royal Australasian College of Physicians supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment Campaign. We are committed to raising awareness of the impacts of cognitive impairment, and working proactively to promote best possible care.

  • Sydney North Health Network

    The Sydney North Health Network supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign and is committed to increasing efficiency of medical services and coordination of patients with dementia and delirium in primary health settings to ensure they receive the right care, in the right place at the right time.

     Better Journeys for People with Dementia in Northern Sydney

    A collaboration between the Northern Sydney Primary Health Network (NSPHN), Northern Sydney Local Health District (NSLHD), Alzheimer’s Australia NSW and Community Care Northern Beaches (CCNB)  and a consumer representative was formed in 2015.

    The collaboration was formed with support from the NSW Agency for Clinical Innovation’s (ACI) Building Partnerships initiative, and aims to strengthen access and navigation of dementia services. While a wide range of dementia services exist in northern Sydney, information is difficult to find and access to services can be confusing for both consumers and healthcare professionals.

    In the early stages of the project, diagnostic and gap analysis activities were undertaken to identify areas of improvement. Local services were mapped by conducting three focus groups comprised of subject matter experts, including local geriatrician Professor Susan Kurrle, as well as community members and health professionals.

    One of the key recommendations was to improve the transfer of care and communication for people with dementia leaving hospital. Limitations in information sharing between the acute and primary care settings were negatively affecting the patient’s health outcomes, particularly after hours. The NSPHN commissioned a new service, the first of its kind: a Hospital Discharge Referral Service. It was designed to support people with dementia after leaving hospital and consequently reduce the likelihood of re-admission and impact on after hours ‘crisis’ presentations. Two local providers were commissioned to provide the Hospital Discharge Referral Service across the region: Kincare and Just Better Care (JBC). JBC, working with public and private hospitals in the Hornsby local government area, has implemented the Stay at Home program. Kincare’s Remember Me program covers Ryde, Royal North Shore, Mona Vale, Manly and private hospitals.

    Both programs have delivered strong results: each patient referred to the program has progressed well with the support of their general practitioner (GP) and other services, with no further re-admission to hospital. 

    The collective expertise of the partnership also enabled the creation of the Memory Problems information booklet for consumers and health professionals. The booklet features educational information such as the stages of dementia and what to expect; local support groups; services to help at home for both the person with dementia and their carer; financial advice; legal matters; advance care planning; and palliative care services.

    Another focus of the partnership is to better support and build capacity in general practice as GPs play an integral role in a patient’s timely diagnosis and ongoing management. Research shows that it usually takes an average of three years to formally diagnose dementia. To reduce timeframes for diagnosis, the collaborative is currently working with the Improvement Foundation on a set of dementia quality indicators. These indicators will support best practice in early detection, diagnosis and management of dementia in primary care, and will be used to create a national quality program for dementia management.  

    Following recommendations, the NSPHN has commissioned a GP referred social work service across the region for patients with chronic and/or complex health conditions. The service allows patients’ social needs to be addressed, as these may be adversely affecting their health outcomes.

    The NSPHN is also building its first online diagnostic and management support tool – HealthPathways. Designed for GPs and primary care providers, the Dementia HealthPathway will provide clinical and local services information about the condition.

    So far the Dementia Better Journeys collaborative has created real change for people living with dementia, and their families. Through providing practical and sustainable solutions, the collaborative has successfully provided better access to care and prevented re-admissions to hospital for people with dementia, which will continue into the future.

     

  • The Australasian Delirium Association

    The Australasian Delirium Association applauds the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign and supports all better care for people with delirium, education for health care professionals, patients and their carer,  and research to improve the prevention and treatment of delirium.

  • The Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre

    The NHMRC Cognitive Decline Partnership Centre (CDPC) supports the work of the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care whose aims are closely aligned with our own. The CDPC aims to improve the lives of people with dementia by developing, communicating and implementing research that improves care. Ensuring health safety and quality within these processes is highly important.

  • The Psychogeriatric Nurses' Association Australia (Inc)

    http://www.pgna.org.au/

    The Psychogeriatric Nurse's Association Australia (Inc) fully support this initiative and fully supports the Caring for Cognitive Impairment campaign. 

  • WA Primary Health Alliance

    WA Primary Health Alliance is committed to promoting best practice integrated care for people with, or at risk of developing, cognitive impairment.

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